Fly Fishing Encyclopedia

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FAUNA

Trout are omnivorous, meaning if it moves they will probably eat it. There is no doubt that they have preferential food sources at certain times of the year and it is essential, therefore, to understand what these food sources are and where they are likely to be found. It will give us a good indication of where the fish are likely to congregate - and thus where to fish. Having said that, this information is intended to give a general outline to those interested in why trout do what they do and does not set out to be a technical dissertation on all things lepidopterous and insectivorous! By having an insight into the actions of the trout's food items it gives us a clue into where the trout may be at any particular time - and where you should be!

Don't expect the fish to be in these feeding zones at all times of the day - they aren't just eating machines. Just like you they will choose to eat when they are hungry, or when a food source becomes available - for example when a fly hatch leaves the shelter of the lake or stream bed. I have seen a poor chap slave away at a particular spot for hours and then I've slipped into his spot when he finally gave up, to be rewarded by a fine bag of trout within an hour. I knew the right time to be fishing that particular spot and he didn't. I did tell him to persevere but by then he'd had enough anyway. I've also watched my fish finder during the course of the day and actually seen fish echoes that have started off in the morning at the bottom of the lake and slowly risen during the course of the day. I suspect very strongly that they were following the fly nymph that was due to hatch that day as it made its way up through the water column. This leads me to believe that the time of day is critical to the depth at which you fish and the method you employ.